Military Hans Högman
Copyright © Hans Högman 2017-05-02

Swedish Regiments of the Allotment System - Cavalry (1)

Cavalry Regiments:

2. Swedish Regiments - Cavalry (1)

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The term "cavalry" wasn't in use until around the 1650's. In Sweden the cavalry was called "rytteriet" (the riders or the horsemen) prior to that time. For example Smålands ryttare and Upplands ryttare (ryttare = horsemen). The Cavalry or "rytteriet" was units who fought on horsebacks. There are several types of cavalry: Dragoons: Dragoon was formerly mounted infantry. They traveled on horseback to the battlefield but they fought as foot soldiers. As mounted infantry they were very mobile units. It happened that dragoons fought as cavalry in battles. However, this was a type of warfare they weren't trained for and could end up in disaster. An example of a battle where dragoons successfully were used as cavalry was the battle of Lund in 1676. During the 18th century the dragoons were more and more used as cavalry and therefore also trained as cavalry. Finally it was only the name that separated them from the light cavalry. During the 19th century dragoons was a term for heavy cavalry. Hussars: Hussars was first a term for The Hungarian heavy cavalry. Hussar regiments were established in Sweden during the 1700's. They were armed with sabers and carbines (short rifles). The Hussars wore dolma until the 1870's when the attila was in use as a tunic. Cuirassiers: The Cuirassiers were the heavy cavalry. The name originates from cuirass which was the name of the armored protection they wore. During the 17th century it became too ungainly (too awkward) to wear a full cuirass. Instead a light cuirass came into use plus a helmet instead of the older full head protection. The cuirassiers were armed with a rapier (sword) and a handgun. Fully equipped cuirassiers were quite heavy so they needed large horses to carry them. During the 19th century the cuirassier regiments didn't differ from other cavalry. Lancers: A lancer was a type of cavalryman who fought with a lance. The weapon was widely used in Asia and Europe during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance by armored cavalry, before being adopted by light cavalry. Lancers typically wore a double- breasted jacket. The tactical unit used by the cavalry was the squadron. A cavalry regiment of 1,000 men was organized into four squadrons of 250 horsemen each. The squadrons were organized into two companies of 125 men each. The cavalry had a very important role in the battles during the Middle Ages. During the 1500's the cavalry became less important in battles due to the use of firearms. The cuirass gave of good protection against arrows but not against bullets. The Swedish king, Gustav II Adolf, restored the importance of the cavalry in the beginning of the 17th century. He introduced a new battle tactic for the cavalry. In the new tactic the cavalry was to charge with the swords ready in their hands. In central Europe the cavalry still used the so-called " karakolering" where the horsemen charged with their handguns. After the handgun had been fired they returned back to their own lines. King Gustav II Adolf had his horsemen to continue the attack after firing the handguns, however now with the swords as weapons. King Karl II had this tactic further refined and called it a "cavalry charge with edged arms" (swords) "kavallerichock med blanka vapen". This tactic made the Swedish cavalry very feared during the Great Nordic War (1700 - 1721). The most important weapon of the Carloean (warriors of King Karl) horseman was the sword ("värja"). The sword was straight rapier. It was a perfect weapon for both cutting as well as thrusting. Later, when fine caliber handguns was introduced and when machineguns came into use the cavalry disappeared from the battlefields. Cavalry had no place in the new modern warfare and World War I was the last war with horsemen in action. The cavalry unit codes begin with letter “k” followed by a number; for example, K1 (1st Cavalry Regiment).

Swedish name: Adelsfanan

The history of the unit goes back to the very old duty of the Nobility to keep horsemen in order to defend the country when needed. This system was called "adelns rusttjänst" and was introduced in 1280. The name of the unit, the Cavalry Corps of the Nobility (Adelsfanan) wasn't in use until 1571. A “fana” was a 16th century name for a unit of cavalry. A fana consisted of 300 cavalrymen. When the Swedish Army units were organized into regiments in the beginning of the 17th century they were given regimental names. However, the "Adelsfanan" kept their old name. All officers in the Cavalry Corps of the Nobility were of noble birth. The regiment was an enlisted (värvad) unit. The regiment was disestablished in 1809. During the regime of King Gustav II Adolf (1611 - 1632) the Cavalry Corps of the Nobility was organized into 4 companies. Three of those were organized in Sweden and one in Finland. A 5th company was established in Sweden in 1640. In 1658, when the province of Skåne became Swedish a 6th company was established in this province. Prior to the New Allotment System (1682) the Cavalry Corps of the Nobility numbered 550 cavalrymen organized into 6 companies. Names of the Companies making up the Regiment: Sweden: Uppland Company, Västgöta Company, Södermanland Company, Östgöta Company and Scanian Company. The company names are names of Swedish provinces. Finland: Lieutenant Colonel's Company (established in the counties of Åbo and Björneborg. The horsemen were recruited only in times of war and according to the privileges of the Nobility this unit was only to serve within Sweden. However, in 1702, King Karl XII had the Swedish companies shipped to the Baltic provinces. The Cavalry Corps of the Nobility participated in the battles of Lund 1676, Fraustadt 1706 and ended up as Russian prisoners of War after the battle of Poltava 1709 when the Swedish Field Army surrendered in Perevolotjna a week after the battle. The Cavalry Corps of the Nobility had their last General Muster in 1743. The unit was never mobilized after that year. The regiment was finally disestablished in 1809. Companies: 1. Life Company (Uppland, Västmanland, Dalarna and Norrland) 2. Major’s Company (Västergötland and Bohuslän) 3. Lieutenant Colonel’s Company (Finnish Company) 4. Östgöta and Småland Company 5. Södermanland Company (Södermanland, Närke and Värmland) 6. Skåne Company (Skåne, Halland, Blekinge)

Swedish name: Livgardet till häst, K1

The regiment was first established in 1770 as the Finnish Light Dragoon Corps (Finska lätta dragonkåren). The regiment was an enlisted regiment. The regiment received the name Light Dragoons of the Life Regiment (Lätta dragonerna av Livgardet) in 1772. In 1793 the regiment received the name Life Hussar Regiment (Livhusarregementet) and in 1797 Light Dragoon Regiment (Lätta Livdragonregementet). In 1806 the regiment carried the name Mounted Life Guards (Livgardet till häst, K1). In 1806 the regiment was organized as hussars, in 1845 dragoons, in 1852 lancers and in 1879 once again dragoons. The regiment was disestablished in 1927. In this year the Life Regiment Dragoons (K2) and the Mounted Life Guards (K1) were merged. The new regiment received the name Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst, K1). In 1949 the regiment received the name the Life Guard Squadron (LivgardesSquadronen) and in 1975 the Life Guard Dragoons (Livgardets dragoner). The regiment was disestablished in 1984. After 1984 the K1 is a cavalry battalion within the Svea Life Guards. The regiment's history goes back to the units that were established in the border provinces facing Russia in the southeast of Finland (Finland was a Swedish region until 1809). In order to strengthen the defense of those border areas, especially along River Kymmene, an enlisted dragoon corps was established in the county of Nyland in 1770. The corps was first organized into 3 squadrons of 50 man each and the unit received the name the Finnish Light Dragoon Corps (Finska lätta dragonkåren). In order to get experienced soldiers into the Finnish Corps many soldiers were transferred from a Swedish Hussar regiment in Pomerania, Northern Germany (Svenska Pommern) to the regiment. The Finnish Light Dragoon Corps was at first based in Borgå, Finland. In command of the corps was, at that time, Colonel Jacob Magnus Sprengtporten. Colonel Sprengtporten was one of King Gustav III promoters to the King’s coup d'état (statskupp) in 1772. King Gustav III now got a total control of the regime of Sweden. Colonel Sprengtporten secured Finland by taking control of Sveaborg fortress outside Helsinki. No unit in Finland could thereby be a threat to the King. Once the Sveaborg fortress was in control by Sprengtporten he was supposed to ship a unit to Stockholm to support the King’s coup d'état. However, due to bad weather, the force didn’t arrive in time for the coup d'état. His force sent to Stockholm numbered 1,000 soldiers, among them 2 dismounted squadrons from the Finnish Light Dragoon Corps. The King promoted Sprengtporten to Lieutenant Colonel in gratitude to his support and loyalty. The Finnish Light Dragoon Corps got the rank of Royal Gurads and received the name Light Dragoon Corps of His Majesty’s Life and Hussar Troops (Lätta dragonkåren av Konungens Liv- och Hustrupper). However, the corps was referred to as The Light Dragoons of the Life Guards (Lätta dragonerna av livgardet). The unit was reorganized into 5 squadrons of 50 men each. Two of the squadrons were based in Stockholm and three in Finland. The entire unit was garrisoned in Stockholm in 1777. Two of the three Finnish squadrons were transferred to Stockholm while the third squadrons was consolidated with the Karelian Dragoons. The four Swedish squadrons were quartered in the cities of Enköping, Sigtuna and Södertälje. At this time Baron Ewert Taube was in command of the unit. In 1793 the entire unit was once again quartered in Stockholm. In 1797 the unit received the name Light Life Dragoon Regiment (Lätta livdragonregementet) and in 1806 Mounted Life Guards (Livgardet till häst). The regiment was enlisted and numbered 1505 cavalrymen. Location of the primary Garrison of the Regiment: From 1770 Borgå (Finland), 1793 Hantverkargatan 45, Stockholm, from 1811 Storgatan 35-49 and from 1897 barracks at Lidingövägen 28.

Swedish name: Livregementet till häst (Upplands ryttare), K2

The regiment was first established in 1626 as the Uppland Horsemen (Upplands ryttare). The regiment was linked to the Allotment System in 1687. The regiment received the name Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst) in 1667. In 1791 the regiment received the name Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens kyrassiärkår) and in 1815 the Dragoon Corps of the Life Regiment (Livregementet dragonkår). In 1892 the regiment carried the name the Life Regiment Dragoons (Livregementets dragoner, K2). The regiment was reorganized into an enlisted regiment in 1901. The regiment was allotted prior to this year. The regiment was disestablished in 1927. In this year the Life Regiment Dragoons (K2) and the Mounted Life Guards (K1) were merged. The new regiment received the name the Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst, K1). The regiment's history goes back to the "fanor" that was raised in the provinces of Uppland and Södermanland in 1536. Those "fanor" were merged in 1608 into the Södermanland Horsemen (Södermanlands fanan eller Södermanlands ryttare). The horsemen were recruited in the provinces of Södermanland, Närke, Västmanland plus Valla och Vadsbo districts of the province of Västergötland. In 1621 the unit was divided into two companies of 125 men each. One of the companies was the Södermanland Company. In 1623 the horsemen in the province of Uppland was organized into 3 companies of 125 men each. As a result of the Constitution adopted in 1634 the Army was reorganized. The Södermanland Horsemen was then disestablished and the horsemen were transferred to the Östgöta Cavalry Regiment. The horsemen in the provinces of Närke and Värmland plus the Västgöta horsemen of the Södermanland horsemen were transferred to the Uppland Horsemen. The Södermanland Horsemen, now serving in the Östgöta Cavalry Regiment, was in 1638 transferred to the Uppland Horsemen. The Uppland Horsemen was at that time organized into 8 companies. In 1667 the regiment was awarded the status of Life Regiment and received the name His Majesty's Mounted Life Regiment (Konungens Livregementet till häst). In 1674 the regiment was extended and now formed 12 companies of 150 men each, in total 1800 cavalrymen. Nils Bielke was in command of the regiment in 1667. After the victorious Battle of Lund in 1676 the regiment was awarded for its bravery. The King Karl XI made the comment after the battle: "Next to God I'm in great gratitude to Nils Bielke and his brave Life Regiment". During the Swedish-Danish War of 1677 - 1679 the regiment was extended to 17 companies. After the war the regiment was reduced to 12 regiments. Four of the companies were located within the province of Uppland, three within Västmanland, three in Närke, one in Södermanland and one in Västergötland, in total 1505 cavalrymen. Names of the Companies making up the Regiment: Life Company, Lieutenant Colonel's Company, Major's Company, Östra Västmanland Company, Östra Närke Company, Södermanland Company, Roslags Company, Örebro Company, Fellingsbro Company, Kungsör Company, Vadsbo Company and North Uppland Company. In 1785 a special unit of light dragoons was established at the regiment. Eighteen cavalrymen from each of the regiment's companies were transferred to the new unit who formed 4 companies of 36 men each. The dragoon unit was later extended and during the Swedish - Russian War 1788 - 1790 the unit served as an independent unit and formed 6 companies of 300 men. This unit received the name Light Dragoon Corps of His Majesty's Life Regiment (Lätta Dragonkåren av Kungl. Maj:ts Livregemente). The names of the Companies making up the Corps: Dragoon Life Company, Uppland Company and North-, South-, East- and West Company. Prior to 1901 the Mounted Life Regiment was the only regiment not being enlisted in the Stockholm garrison. The regiment was then an allotted regiment. In 1791 the Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst) was converted into a brigade and divided into three corps: 1. Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens kyrassiärkår) 2. Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta dragonkår) 3. Light Infantry Battalion of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta infanteribataljon) The Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Dragoons (Livregementets dragoner, K2). This Corps was formed by the companies located around Stockholm. The Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Hussars (Livregementets husarer, K3). The Light Infantry Battalion of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Grenadiers (Livregementets grenadjärer, I3). The three corps of the brigade mentioned above received a status of independent corps in 1815. The Mounted Life Regiment was prior to 1791 allotted with 1505 "rusthåll". Hence, the Regiment had 1505 cavalrymen organized into 12 companies (3 battalions). After 1792 the regiment formed one battalion. After 1815 the regiment carried the name the Dragoon Corps of the Life Regiment (K2) and was allotted with 505 "rusthåll". The county of Uppsala had 279 "rusthåll" located within the county, the county of Stockholm 221 and the county of Gävleborg 5. After 1833 the regiment formed 5 squadrons. Location of the primary Garrison of the Mounted Life Regiment: From 1881, Wiksberg, södra Djurgården, Stockholm. Training camp: 1780 Utnäs löt at Strömsholm, from 1815 Polacksbacken, Uppsala and Ladugårdsgärde, Stockholm. Squadrons, 1833: 1. Life Squadron 2. Sigtuna Squadron 3. Roslags Squadron 4. North Uppland Squadron 5. Uppsala Squadron

Swedish name: Livregementets husarer, K3

In 1791 the Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst) was converted into a brigade and divided into three corps: 1. Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens kyrassiärkår) 2. Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta dragonkår) 3. Light Infantry Battalion of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta infanteribataljon) The Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Dragoons (Livregementets dragoner, K2). This Corps was formed by the companies located around Stockholm. The Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Hussars (Livregementets husarer, K3). The Light Infantry Battalion of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Grenadiers (Livregementets grenadjärer, I3). The three corps of the brigade mentioned above received a status of independent corps in 1815. The unit first received the name Light Dragoon Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta dragonkår) in 1791 and in 1796 Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens husarkår). In 1892 the regiment carried the name Life Regiment Hussars (Livregementets husarer, K3). In 1791 the unit was organized into 8 squadrons. After 1815 the regiment was allotted with 500 "rusthåll". The county of Västmanland had 25 "rusthåll" located within the county, the county of Örebro 335, the county of Södermanland 15 and the county of Skaraborg 125. In 1834 the number of squadrons were reduced to 5. The names of the Companies making up the Corps: Fellingsbro, Örebro, Östra Närkes, Västra Närkes, Sanna, Arboga and Vadsbo squadrons. The Östra Närkes suadron had 15 "rusthåll" in county of Södermanland. Location of the primary Garrison of the Regiment: 1836 Örebro, from 1891 Skövde, from 1984 Karlsborg. Training camp: From 1830 Utnäs löt and Axevalla hed, from 1843 Sanna hed, Örebro, 1867 Axevalla hed, 1881 Sanna hed Uppsala and Ladugårdsgärde, Stockholm. Squadrons 1834: 1. Life Squadron (formerly Fellingsbro squadron) 2. Örebro Squadron 3. Östra Närkes Squadron 4. Västra Närkes Squadron 5. Vadsbo Squadron

Swedish name: Smålands kavalleriregemente (Smålands ryttare), K4

The regiment was first established in 1628 as the Småland Horsemen (Smålands ryttare). The regiment was linked to the Allotment System in 1695. The regiment received the name Småland Cavalry Regiment (Smålands kavalleriregemente) in 1684. In 1792 the regiment carried the name Småland Light Cavalry Regiment (Smålands lätta kavalleriregemente) and in 1802 Småland Light Dragoon Regiment (Smålands lätta dragonregemente). In 1808 the regiment received the name Småland Dragoon Regiment (Småland dragonregemente). The regiment was divided into two units in 1812. The former 2nd Battalion of the regiment was reorganized into infantry and received the name Infantry Battalion of the Småland Dragoon Regiment (Smålands dragonregementes infanteribataljon). The former 1st Battalion of the regiment kept the name "Småland Dragoon Regiment". However this name was changed to the Småland Hussar Regiment (Smålands husarregemente) in 1822. The regiment was disestablished in 1927. The regiment's history goes back to the "fanor" that was raised in the counties of Kalmar and Kronoberg (province of Småland) in 1543. The regiment was allotted with 1000 "rusthåll". Hence, the Regiment had 1000 cavalrymen organized into 8 companies. All of the "rusthåll" were located within the province of Småland. After 1812, when the former cavalry regiment was divided, the new dragoon regiment had 500 cavalrymen organized into 6 squadrons of 83 men each. The county of Jönköping had 250 "rusthåll" located within the county, the county Kalmar 138 and the county of Kronoberg 112. The regiment was organized into 5 squadrons in 1833. Names of the Companies making up the Regiment: Life Company, Lieutenant Colonel's Company, Major's Company, Sunnerbo Company, Växjö Company, Jönköping Company, Vetlanda Company and Östra härads Company. Location of the primary Garrison of the Regiment: From 1906, Eksjö. Training camp: From 1686 Ränneslätt, 1806 Qvarnarp, 1827 Ränneslätt. Squadrons 1833: 1. Life Squadron 2. Södra Vedbo Squadron 3. Vetlanda Squadron 4. Ingelsta Squadron 5. Staby Squadron Infantry Battalion of the Småland Dragoon Regiment: After 1812, when the former cavalry regiment was divided the 2nd battalion received the name Infantry Battalion of the Småland Dragoon Regiment (Smålands dragonregementes infanteribataljon). In 1824 the name was changed to Småland Grenadier Battalion (Smålands grenadjärbataljon, I7). The battalion was allotted with 500 "rotar". Hence, the Regiment had 500 soldiers organized into 4 companies. All of the "rotar" were located within the counties of Jönköping (399 "rotar") and Kronoberg (101 "rotar"). Companies 1833: 1. Livkompaniet 2. Östra Härads kompani 3. Sunnerbo kompani 4. Jönköpings kompani Victorious Battle Campaigns (segernamn), Småland Cavalry Regiment: 1. Wallhof 1626 2. Werben 1631 3. Breitenfeldt 1631 4. Lützen 1632 5. Oldendorf 1633 6. Wittstock 1636 7. Golombo 1656 8. Gnesen 1656 9. Warschau 1656 10. Fredriksodde 1657 11. Bält 1658 12. Lund 1676 13. Landskrona 1677 14. Klissow 1702 15. Pultrusk 1703 16. Warschau 1705 17. Holowzin 1708 18. Helsingborg 1710 19. Svensksund 1790 Source: segernamn: Kungl. Smålands Husarregementes Historia (Eksjö 1975)

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The Allotment System Swedish Wars The Navy & the Army Fleet Swedish Military Unit Designations Swedish Military Branch and Unit Insignias Uniforms of the Swedish Army Source References Top of page
Mounted Life Guards (Horse Guards), K1
Mounted Life Regiment (The Uppland Horsemen), K2
Life Regiment Hussars, K3
Småland Cavalry Regiment (Småland Horesmen), K4
Cavalry Corps of the Nobility
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Military Hans Högman
Copyright © Hans Högman 2017-05-02

Swedish Regiments of the

Allotment System - Cavalry (1)

Cavalry Regiments:

2. Swedish Regiments -

Cavalry (1)

The term "cavalry" wasn't in use until around the 1650's. In Sweden the cavalry was called "rytteriet" (the riders or the horsemen) prior to that time. For example Smålands ryttare and Upplands ryttare (ryttare = horsemen). The Cavalry or "rytteriet" was units who fought on horsebacks. There are several types of cavalry: Dragoons: Dragoon was formerly mounted infantry. They traveled on horseback to the battlefield but they fought as foot soldiers. As mounted infantry they were very mobile units. It happened that dragoons fought as cavalry in battles. However, this was a type of warfare they weren't trained for and could end up in disaster. An example of a battle where dragoons successfully were used as cavalry was the battle of Lund in 1676. During the 18th century the dragoons were more and more used as cavalry and therefore also trained as cavalry. Finally it was only the name that separated them from the light cavalry. During the 19th century dragoons was a term for heavy cavalry. Hussars: Hussars was first a term for The Hungarian heavy cavalry. Hussar regiments were established in Sweden during the 1700's. They were armed with sabers and carbines (short rifles). The Hussars wore dolma until the 1870's when the attila was in use as a tunic. Cuirassiers: The Cuirassiers were the heavy cavalry. The name originates from cuirass which was the name of the armored protection they wore. During the 17th century it became too ungainly (too awkward) to wear a full cuirass. Instead a light cuirass came into use plus a helmet instead of the older full head protection. The cuirassiers were armed with a rapier (sword) and a handgun. Fully equipped cuirassiers were quite heavy so they needed large horses to carry them. During the 19th century the cuirassier regiments didn't differ from other cavalry. Lancers: A lancer was a type of cavalryman who fought with a lance. The weapon was widely used in Asia and Europe during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance by armored cavalry, before being adopted by light cavalry. Lancers typically wore a double-breasted jacket. The tactical unit used by the cavalry was the squadron. A cavalry regiment of 1,000 men was organized into four squadrons of 250 horsemen each. The squadrons were organized into two companies of 125 men each. The cavalry had a very important role in the battles during the Middle Ages. During the 1500's the cavalry became less important in battles due to the use of firearms. The cuirass gave of good protection against arrows but not against bullets. The Swedish king, Gustav II Adolf, restored the importance of the cavalry in the beginning of the 17th century. He introduced a new battle tactic for the cavalry. In the new tactic the cavalry was to charge with the swords ready in their hands. In central Europe the cavalry still used the so-called " karakolering" where the horsemen charged with their handguns. After the handgun had been fired they returned back to their own lines. King Gustav II Adolf had his horsemen to continue the attack after firing the handguns, however now with the swords as weapons. King Karl II had this tactic further refined and called it a "cavalry charge with edged arms" (swords) "kavallerichock med blanka vapen". This tactic made the Swedish cavalry very feared during the Great Nordic War (1700 - 1721). The most important weapon of the Carloean (warriors of King Karl) horseman was the sword ("värja"). The sword was straight rapier. It was a perfect weapon for both cutting as well as thrusting. Later, when fine caliber handguns was introduced and when machineguns came into use the cavalry disappeared from the battlefields. Cavalry had no place in the new modern warfare and World War I was the last war with horsemen in action. The cavalry unit codes begin with letter “k” followed by a number; for example, K1 (1st Cavalry Regiment).

Swedish name: Adelsfanan

The history of the unit goes back to the very old duty of the Nobility to keep horsemen in order to defend the country when needed. This system was called "adelns rusttjänst" and was introduced in 1280. The name of the unit, the Cavalry Corps of the Nobility (Adelsfanan) wasn't in use until 1571. A “fana” was a 16th century name for a unit of cavalry. A fana consisted of 300 cavalrymen. When the Swedish Army units were organized into regiments in the beginning of the 17th century they were given regimental names. However, the "Adelsfanan" kept their old name. All officers in the Cavalry Corps of the Nobility were of noble birth. The regiment was an enlisted (värvad) unit. The regiment was disestablished in 1809. During the regime of King Gustav II Adolf (1611 - 1632) the Cavalry Corps of the Nobility was organized into 4 companies. Three of those were organized in Sweden and one in Finland. A 5th company was established in Sweden in 1640. In 1658, when the province of Skåne became Swedish a 6th company was established in this province. Prior to the New Allotment System (1682) the Cavalry Corps of the Nobility numbered 550 cavalrymen organized into 6 companies. Names of the Companies making up the Regiment: Sweden: Uppland Company, Västgöta Company, Södermanland Company, Östgöta Company and Scanian Company. The company names are names of Swedish provinces. Finland: Lieutenant Colonel's Company (established in the counties of Åbo and Björneborg. The horsemen were recruited only in times of war and according to the privileges of the Nobility this unit was only to serve within Sweden. However, in 1702, King Karl XII had the Swedish companies shipped to the Baltic provinces. The Cavalry Corps of the Nobility participated in the battles of Lund 1676, Fraustadt 1706 and ended up as Russian prisoners of War after the battle of Poltava 1709 when the Swedish Field Army surrendered in Perevolotjna a week after the battle. The Cavalry Corps of the Nobility had their last General Muster in 1743. The unit was never mobilized after that year. The regiment was finally disestablished in 1809. Companies: 1. Life Company (Uppland, Västmanland, Dalarna and Norrland) 2. Major’s Company (Västergötland and Bohuslän) 3. Lieutenant Colonel’s Company (Finnish Company) 4. Östgöta and Småland Company 5. Södermanland Company (Södermanland, Närke and Värmland) 6. Skåne Company (Skåne, Halland, Blekinge)

Swedish name: Livgardet till

häst, K1

The regiment was first established in 1770 as the Finnish Light Dragoon Corps (Finska lätta dragonkåren). The regiment was an enlisted regiment. The regiment received the name Light Dragoons of the Life Regiment (Lätta dragonerna av Livgardet) in 1772. In 1793 the regiment received the name Life Hussar Regiment (Livhusarregementet) and in 1797 Light Dragoon Regiment (Lätta Livdragonregementet). In 1806 the regiment carried the name Mounted Life Guards (Livgardet till häst, K1). In 1806 the regiment was organized as hussars, in 1845 dragoons, in 1852 lancers and in 1879 once again dragoons. The regiment was disestablished in 1927. In this year the Life Regiment Dragoons (K2) and the Mounted Life Guards (K1) were merged. The new regiment received the name Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst, K1). In 1949 the regiment received the name the Life Guard Squadron (LivgardesSquadronen) and in 1975 the Life Guard Dragoons (Livgardets dragoner). The regiment was disestablished in 1984. After 1984 the K1 is a cavalry battalion within the Svea Life Guards. The regiment's history goes back to the units that were established in the border provinces facing Russia in the southeast of Finland (Finland was a Swedish region until 1809). In order to strengthen the defense of those border areas, especially along River Kymmene, an enlisted dragoon corps was established in the county of Nyland in 1770. The corps was first organized into 3 squadrons of 50 man each and the unit received the name the Finnish Light Dragoon Corps (Finska lätta dragonkåren). In order to get experienced soldiers into the Finnish Corps many soldiers were transferred from a Swedish Hussar regiment in Pomerania, Northern Germany (Svenska Pommern) to the regiment. The Finnish Light Dragoon Corps was at first based in Borgå, Finland. In command of the corps was, at that time, Colonel Jacob Magnus Sprengtporten. Colonel Sprengtporten was one of King Gustav III promoters to the King’s coup d'état (statskupp) in 1772. King Gustav III now got a total control of the regime of Sweden. Colonel Sprengtporten secured Finland by taking control of Sveaborg fortress outside Helsinki. No unit in Finland could thereby be a threat to the King. Once the Sveaborg fortress was in control by Sprengtporten he was supposed to ship a unit to Stockholm to support the King’s coup d'état. However, due to bad weather, the force didn’t arrive in time for the coup d'état. His force sent to Stockholm numbered 1,000 soldiers, among them 2 dismounted squadrons from the Finnish Light Dragoon Corps. The King promoted Sprengtporten to Lieutenant Colonel in gratitude to his support and loyalty. The Finnish Light Dragoon Corps got the rank of Royal Gurads and received the name Light Dragoon Corps of His Majesty’s Life and Hussar Troops (Lätta dragonkåren av Konungens Liv- och Hustrupper). However, the corps was referred to as The Light Dragoons of the Life Guards (Lätta dragonerna av livgardet). The unit was reorganized into 5 squadrons of 50 men each. Two of the squadrons were based in Stockholm and three in Finland. The entire unit was garrisoned in Stockholm in 1777. Two of the three Finnish squadrons were transferred to Stockholm while the third squadrons was consolidated with the Karelian Dragoons. The four Swedish squadrons were quartered in the cities of Enköping, Sigtuna and Södertälje. At this time Baron Ewert Taube was in command of the unit. In 1793 the entire unit was once again quartered in Stockholm. In 1797 the unit received the name Light Life Dragoon Regiment (Lätta livdragonregementet) and in 1806 Mounted Life Guards (Livgardet till häst). The regiment was enlisted and numbered 1505 cavalrymen. Location of the primary Garrison of the Regiment: From 1770 Borgå (Finland), 1793 Hantverkargatan 45, Stockholm, from 1811 Storgatan 35-49 and from 1897 barracks at Lidingövägen 28.

Swedish name: Livregementet

till häst (Upplands ryttare), K2

The regiment was first established in 1626 as the Uppland Horsemen (Upplands ryttare). The regiment was linked to the Allotment System in 1687. The regiment received the name Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst) in 1667. In 1791 the regiment received the name Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens kyrassiärkår) and in 1815 the Dragoon Corps of the Life Regiment (Livregementet dragonkår). In 1892 the regiment carried the name the Life Regiment Dragoons (Livregementets dragoner, K2). The regiment was reorganized into an enlisted regiment in 1901. The regiment was allotted prior to this year. The regiment was disestablished in 1927. In this year the Life Regiment Dragoons (K2) and the Mounted Life Guards (K1) were merged. The new regiment received the name the Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst, K1). The regiment's history goes back to the "fanor" that was raised in the provinces of Uppland and Södermanland in 1536. Those "fanor" were merged in 1608 into the Södermanland Horsemen (Södermanlands fanan eller Södermanlands ryttare). The horsemen were recruited in the provinces of Södermanland, Närke, Västmanland plus Valla och Vadsbo districts of the province of Västergötland. In 1621 the unit was divided into two companies of 125 men each. One of the companies was the Södermanland Company. In 1623 the horsemen in the province of Uppland was organized into 3 companies of 125 men each. As a result of the Constitution adopted in 1634 the Army was reorganized. The Södermanland Horsemen was then disestablished and the horsemen were transferred to the Östgöta Cavalry Regiment. The horsemen in the provinces of Närke and Värmland plus the Västgöta horsemen of the Södermanland horsemen were transferred to the Uppland Horsemen. The Södermanland Horsemen, now serving in the Östgöta Cavalry Regiment, was in 1638 transferred to the Uppland Horsemen. The Uppland Horsemen was at that time organized into 8 companies. In 1667 the regiment was awarded the status of Life Regiment and received the name His Majesty's Mounted Life Regiment (Konungens Livregementet till häst). In 1674 the regiment was extended and now formed 12 companies of 150 men each, in total 1800 cavalrymen. Nils Bielke was in command of the regiment in 1667. After the victorious Battle of Lund in 1676 the regiment was awarded for its bravery. The King Karl XI made the comment after the battle: "Next to God I'm in great gratitude to Nils Bielke and his brave Life Regiment". During the Swedish-Danish War of 1677 - 1679 the regiment was extended to 17 companies. After the war the regiment was reduced to 12 regiments. Four of the companies were located within the province of Uppland, three within Västmanland, three in Närke, one in Södermanland and one in Västergötland, in total 1505 cavalrymen. Names of the Companies making up the Regiment: Life Company, Lieutenant Colonel's Company, Major's Company, Östra Västmanland Company, Östra Närke Company, Södermanland Company, Roslags Company, Örebro Company, Fellingsbro Company, Kungsör Company, Vadsbo Company and North Uppland Company. In 1785 a special unit of light dragoons was established at the regiment. Eighteen cavalrymen from each of the regiment's companies were transferred to the new unit who formed 4 companies of 36 men each. The dragoon unit was later extended and during the Swedish - Russian War 1788 - 1790 the unit served as an independent unit and formed 6 companies of 300 men. This unit received the name Light Dragoon Corps of His Majesty's Life Regiment (Lätta Dragonkåren av Kungl. Maj:ts Livregemente). The names of the Companies making up the Corps: Dragoon Life Company, Uppland Company and North-, South-, East- and West Company. Prior to 1901 the Mounted Life Regiment was the only regiment not being enlisted in the Stockholm garrison. The regiment was then an allotted regiment. In 1791 the Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst) was converted into a brigade and divided into three corps: 1. Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens kyrassiärkår) 2. Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta dragonkår) 3. Light Infantry Battalion of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta infanteribataljon) The Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Dragoons (Livregementets dragoner, K2). This Corps was formed by the companies located around Stockholm. The Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Hussars (Livregementets husarer, K3). The Light Infantry Battalion of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Grenadiers (Livregementets grenadjärer, I3). The three corps of the brigade mentioned above received a status of independent corps in 1815. The Mounted Life Regiment was prior to 1791 allotted with 1505 "rusthåll". Hence, the Regiment had 1505 cavalrymen organized into 12 companies (3 battalions). After 1792 the regiment formed one battalion. After 1815 the regiment carried the name the Dragoon Corps of the Life Regiment (K2) and was allotted with 505 "rusthåll". The county of Uppsala had 279 "rusthåll" located within the county, the county of Stockholm 221 and the county of Gävleborg 5. After 1833 the regiment formed 5 squadrons. Location of the primary Garrison of the Mounted Life Regiment: From 1881, Wiksberg, södra Djurgården, Stockholm. Training camp: 1780 Utnäs löt at Strömsholm, from 1815 Polacksbacken, Uppsala and Ladugårdsgärde, Stockholm. Squadrons, 1833: 1. Life Squadron 2. Sigtuna Squadron 3. Roslags Squadron 4. North Uppland Squadron 5. Uppsala Squadron

Swedish name: Livregementets

husarer, K3

In 1791 the Mounted Life Regiment (Livregementet till häst) was converted into a brigade and divided into three corps: 1. Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens kyrassiärkår) 2. Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta dragonkår) 3. Light Infantry Battalion of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta infanteribataljon) The Cuirassier Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Dragoons (Livregementets dragoner, K2). This Corps was formed by the companies located around Stockholm. The Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Hussars (Livregementets husarer, K3). The Light Infantry Battalion of the Life Regiment Brigade later became Life Regiment Grenadiers (Livregementets grenadjärer, I3). The three corps of the brigade mentioned above received a status of independent corps in 1815. The unit first received the name Light Dragoon Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens lätta dragonkår) in 1791 and in 1796 Hussar Corps of the Life Regiment Brigade (Livregementsbrigadens husarkår). In 1892 the regiment carried the name Life Regiment Hussars (Livregementets husarer, K3). In 1791 the unit was organized into 8 squadrons. After 1815 the regiment was allotted with 500 "rusthåll". The county of Västmanland had 25 "rusthåll" located within the county, the county of Örebro 335, the county of Södermanland 15 and the county of Skaraborg 125. In 1834 the number of squadrons were reduced to 5. The names of the Companies making up the Corps: Fellingsbro, Örebro, Östra Närkes, Västra Närkes, Sanna, Arboga and Vadsbo squadrons. The Östra Närkes suadron had 15 "rusthåll" in county of Södermanland. Location of the primary Garrison of the Regiment: 1836 Örebro, from 1891 Skövde, from 1984 Karlsborg. Training camp: From 1830 Utnäs löt and Axevalla hed, from 1843 Sanna hed, Örebro, 1867 Axevalla hed, 1881 Sanna hed Uppsala and Ladugårdsgärde, Stockholm. Squadrons 1834: 1. Life Squadron (formerly Fellingsbro squadron) 2. Örebro Squadron 3. Östra Närkes Squadron 4. Västra Närkes Squadron 5. Vadsbo Squadron

Swedish name: Smålands

kavalleriregemente (Smålands

ryttare), K4

The regiment was first established in 1628 as the Småland Horsemen (Smålands ryttare). The regiment was linked to the Allotment System in 1695. The regiment received the name Småland Cavalry Regiment (Smålands kavalleriregemente) in 1684. In 1792 the regiment carried the name Småland Light Cavalry Regiment (Smålands lätta kavalleriregemente) and in 1802 Småland Light Dragoon Regiment (Smålands lätta dragonregemente). In 1808 the regiment received the name Småland Dragoon Regiment (Småland dragonregemente). The regiment was divided into two units in 1812. The former 2nd Battalion of the regiment was reorganized into infantry and received the name Infantry Battalion of the Småland Dragoon Regiment (Smålands dragonregementes infanteribataljon). The former 1st Battalion of the regiment kept the name "Småland Dragoon Regiment". However this name was changed to the Småland Hussar Regiment (Smålands husarregemente) in 1822. The regiment was disestablished in 1927. The regiment's history goes back to the "fanor" that was raised in the counties of Kalmar and Kronoberg (province of Småland) in 1543. The regiment was allotted with 1000 "rusthåll". Hence, the Regiment had 1000 cavalrymen organized into 8 companies. All of the "rusthåll" were located within the province of Småland. After 1812, when the former cavalry regiment was divided, the new dragoon regiment had 500 cavalrymen organized into 6 squadrons of 83 men each. The county of Jönköping had 250 "rusthåll" located within the county, the county Kalmar 138 and the county of Kronoberg 112. The regiment was organized into 5 squadrons in 1833. Names of the Companies making up the Regiment: Life Company, Lieutenant Colonel's Company, Major's Company, Sunnerbo Company, Växjö Company, Jönköping Company, Vetlanda Company and Östra härads Company. Location of the primary Garrison of the Regiment: From 1906, Eksjö. Training camp: From 1686 Ränneslätt, 1806 Qvarnarp, 1827 Ränneslätt. Squadrons 1833: 1. Life Squadron 2. Södra Vedbo Squadron 3. Vetlanda Squadron 4. Ingelsta Squadron 5. Staby Squadron Infantry Battalion of the Småland Dragoon Regiment: After 1812, when the former cavalry regiment was divided the 2nd battalion received the name Infantry Battalion of the Småland Dragoon Regiment (Smålands dragonregementes infanteribataljon). In 1824 the name was changed to Småland Grenadier Battalion (Smålands grenadjärbataljon, I7). The battalion was allotted with 500 "rotar". Hence, the Regiment had 500 soldiers organized into 4 companies. All of the "rotar" were located within the counties of Jönköping (399 "rotar") and Kronoberg (101 "rotar"). Companies 1833: 1. Livkompaniet 2. Östra Härads kompani 3. Sunnerbo kompani 4. Jönköpings kompani Victorious Battle Campaigns (segernamn), Småland Cavalry Regiment: 1. Wallhof 1626 2. Werben 1631 3. Breitenfeldt 1631 4. Lützen 1632 5. Oldendorf 1633 6. Wittstock 1636 7. Golombo 1656 8. Gnesen 1656 9. Warschau 1656 10. Fredriksodde 1657 11. Bält 1658 12. Lund 1676 13. Landskrona 1677 14. Klissow 1702 15. Pultrusk 1703 16. Warschau 1705 17. Holowzin 1708 18. Helsingborg 1710 19. Svensksund 1790 Source: segernamn: Kungl. Smålands Husarregementes Historia (Eksjö 1975)

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Cavalry Corps of the Nobility

Mounted Life Guards, K1

Mounted Life Regiment, K2

Life Regiment Hussars, K3

Småland Cavalry Regiment, K4