Military Hans Högman
Copyright © Hans Högman 2022-06-12

Swedish Combat Aircraft - Signals Intelligence Aircraft

Signals Intelligence Aircraft

Signals intelligence (SIGINT) is intelligence-gathering by interception of signals, whether communications between people or from electronic signals not directly used in communication. SIGINT involves the exploration and monitoring of data and/or telecommunications traffic through eavesdropping, listening, etc., to gather intelligence and includes the whole chain of collection, processing, analysis, and reporting. The platforms where signal detection equipment is most often installed are towers, ships, and aircraft. Sweden: examples of towers are in Kåseberga, examples of ships are HMS Orion (A 201), and examples of aircraft are S 102B and S 100 Argus.

List of Swedish Signals Intelligence Aircraft

Tp 79 - Douglas DC-3, 8 in Swedish service 1949 - 1984 Tp 52 - English Electric Canberra, 2 in Swedish service 1960 - 1971 Tp 85 - Sud Aviation S.E 210 Caravelle 2 in Swedish service 1972 - 1998 S 102 - Gulfstream IV, 2 in Swedish service 1992 - S 100 - Saab 340, 4 in Swedish service 1997 - Saab Globaleye AEW&C

Swedish Military Aircraft - 8

To the List of Swedish signals intelligence aircraft

Related Links

Swedish Military Aircraft - start Military Propeller-driven Aircraft Military Jet Aircraft Signal Intelligence Aircraft Military Helicopters Nationality Markings - Sweden History of the Swedish Air Force Unit Designation of the Swedish Air Force Uniforms of the Swedish Air Force Aircraft Warning Service - Female Aircraft Observers, Sweden Sweden’s Military Preparedness 1939 - 1945 Military Images, Sweden, 1939 - 1945 Swedish F 19 Air Wing in Finland in 1940 (Swedish Volunteer Corps)

Source References

1. Flygvapnets historia, överstelöjtnant Lennert Berns 2. Svenska flygvapnets förband och skolor under 1900-talet, Christian Braunstein, 2003 3. Försvarets historiska telesamingar, Flyghistoria från SFF, Flygvapnet 4. Flygvapenmuseum (Swedish Air Force Museum, Linköping) 5. Svenska stridspiloter flög bakom järnridån, artikel i DN 2021-05-27. 6. Wikipedia 7. Digitaltmuseum Top of page

Douglas DC-3, Tp 79

The Douglas DC-3 is a propeller-driven aircraft that existed both in civilian and military versions. It is one of the world's most widely produced transport and passenger aircraft. The prototype flew as early as 17 December 1935. In total, more than 16,000 DC-3s were produced (mainly for military use). The DC-3 had its heyday during World War II when the need for fast transport increased enormously. A military version with a cargo door, a reinforced floor, reinforced wings, and increased maximum take-off weight, was designated C-47 Skytrain. This version was by far the most produced. The RAF and RCAF designated the aircraft the Dakota. The military troop transport version in turn became the C-53 Skytrooper. As early as 1937, the Swedish airline ABA (AB Aerotransport) bought a few DC-3s to be used on international routes. During World War II a courier service was maintained by ABA to England with DC-3s. They always flew in bad weather and with the lights off, but on the night of 27-28 August 1943, the Gladan (SE-BAF) disappeared over the North Sea on its way home from Scotland. Courier traffic continued and on 22 October 1943, the Gripen (SE-BAG) was attacked by German fighters and only two of the crew survived. After these two shoot-downs, flights were suspended for a time. After the war, a large number of DC-3s were available on the second-hand market, and ABA added several aircraft to its fleet. Between 1949 and 1984, Douglas DC-3s were used by the Swedish Air Force as transport aircraft, designated Tp 79. The Air Force purchased its first two DC-3s in 1949, which were converted for use in signals intelligence. The last Tp 79 was purchased in 1975. In total, the Air Force operated eight aircraft, but never more than six at any one time. The last aircraft was retired in 1984. Among the many uses of the aircraft in the Swedish Air Force were signals intelligence, material transport, development and testing of new electronics and radar equipment, training of navigators, transport of Army paratroopers, VIP transport, etc. Most famous is 79001, the Tp 79 spy plane that on a spy mission was shot down by Soviet fighter aircraft on 13 June 1952, which gave rise to the so-called Catalina Affair. The 79001 was used for signals intelligence and the nickname was Hugin. Hugin's sister aircraft was 79002, also used for signals intelligence, and it was nicknamed Munin. Both came to the Air Force in 1949 and were based at F 8 Barkarby Air Wing, without either a fin identification code or a Wing number. In Norse mythology, Hugin and Munin are Odin's two ravens that he sends out into the world daily to gather information for him. So, Hugin and Munin are appropriate names for the two spy planes. More information on Signals intelligence and the Catalina Affair Specifications: Length 19.64 m Wingspan 28.95 m Height 5.16 m Empty weight 8,030 kg Max. takeoff weight 12,200 kg Engines 2 × Pratt & Whitney R-1830-90C Engine power 2 x 1,200 hp Max. speed 250 km/h Range 2,420 km Max. flight altitude 5,000 m Load capacity 2,500 kg Troop capacity 21 - 32 soldiers Images:
Douglas DC3 (Tp 79 Hugin with identification No 79001) at Svea Wing F8 at Barkarby in 1951, i.e. the year before it was shot down by the Soviets. Image: Wikipedia.
Douglas DC3 Tp 79 with identification No 79004, low overflight after last military take-off from Bromma Airport on 3 April 1984. Image: Wikipedia.

English Electric Canberra Tp 52

The English Electric Canberra was a British first-generation jet-powered bomber developed shortly after World War II. The jet propulsion enabled the Canberra aircraft to fly higher and faster than any previous bomber, and thus also avoid being engaged by enemy air defenses. The Swedish Air Force acquired a Canberra (s/n 52001) in February 1960 to be used primarily for signals intelligence and yet another aircraft (52002) in March 1960 to be used as a flying research platform. These were designated Tp 52 in Sweden. The two aircraft were secretly modified in Sweden as spy planes for signals intelligence gathering on the Soviet, Polish, and East German military radio transmissions, although this was not publicly acknowledged until ten years later. They were replaced by two Caravelles Tp 85 in 1971. Specifications: Length 21.3 m Wingspan 19.3 m Height 4.7 m Max. takeoff weight 17,200 kg Max. speed 930 km/h Image:
The preparing of a Canberra Tp 52 (52002) for takeoff at Östgöta Wing (F 3) in 1973. Image: Flygvapenmuseum, ID: FVMF.002908.

Sud Aviation Caravelle Tp 85

The Sud Aviation Caravelle is a jet aircraft manufactured in France that was groundbreaking as it was the first jet-powered aircraft with the engines located in the aft section and not in the wings. The first flight took place in May 1955. Between 1972 and 1998, Sud Aviation Caravelle was part of the Swedish Air Force with the Swedish military designation Tp 85. TP 85 entered service primarily to replace Tp 52 Canberra as the Swedish Defense Radio Establishment's signals intelligence aircraft. Two aircraft were purchased from SAS. The last flight of 85172 took place in September 1998. TP 85 was replaced in its role as a signals intelligence aircraft by S 102B Gulfstream IV. Specifications: Length 32.0 - 36.2 m Wingspan 34.3 m Height 8.72 m Wing area 146.7 m² Empty weight 24,185 - 30,055 kg Max. takeoff weight 46,000 - 56,000 kg Engines 2 × Rolls-Royce Avon RA.29 and P&W CT8D Max. speed 850 km/h (Mach 0,81) Range 3,200 km Max. flight altitude 8,500 m Image:
Swedish signals intelligence aircraft Gulfstream IV, S 102B Korpen (G-IV), s/n 102002, in 2006. Note the elongated appliance extension on the underside. Image: Wikipedia.
Signals intelligence aircraft Tp 85 Sud Aviation Caravelle, 1970. Image: Flygvapenmuseum, ID: FVM.149957.
Saab GlobalEye AEW&C. Image: Saab.
Saab S 100B Argus (Saab 340 AEW&C) in flight. Image: Swedish Armed Forces.

Gulfstream IV, S 102B

The Gulfstream IV (or G-IV) is a twin-engine business jet aircraft manufactured by Gulfstream Aerospace in the United States. The Swedish Air Force has since 1992 three Gulfstream IV in its fleet which goes under the designation Tp 102C (1 aircraft), (and one Gulfstream G550 with designation Tp 102D) and two S 102B. The Tp 102A, which was the first individual purchased in 1992, was retired in August 2015. The TP 102C/D (and former TP 102A) is mainly used for long and time-critical transport of Sweden's highest civilian and military leadership as well as the Royal Family. The S 102B has been converted to carry out airborne signals intelligence for the Swedish Defense Radio Agency (FRA) and can be identified by the elongated equipment extension underneath. The two S 102Bs are sometimes referred to as the Raven (Korpen) and the two aircraft individuals as Hugin and Munin. Specifications: Length 26.9 m Wingspan 23.7 m Height 7.44 m Empty weight 19,500 kg Max. takeoff weight 33,200 kg Engines 2 × Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 Max. speed 935 km/h Range 7,820 km Max. flight altitude 13,700 m Image:

Saab 340 AEW&C – S 100 Argus

The Saab 340 AEW&C is a Swedish twin-engine propeller-driven airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) aircraft manufactured by Saab AB and based on the Saab 340 civil passenger aircraft. The aircraft entered service with the Swedish Air Force in 1997. The Swedish Air Force uses 6 Saab 340 AEW&C. In the Air Force, the Saab 340 AEW&C is designated S 100 Argus, and all aircraft belong to the Skaraborg Air Wing (F 7) but are stationed at Malmen Airbase in Malmslätt outside Linköping. Two of the aircraft are built for peacetime transport missions (designated Tp 100A and Tp 100C), while the other 4 aircraft (S 100) are permanently equipped for Fighting command and air surveillance (STRIL) - Air Defense Control System. The system was delivered to the Air Force in the late 1990s. Two of the aircraft are equipped with the older FSR 890 system, Airborne Surveillance and Control 890, (designated S 100B), and two with the newer ASC 890 system, Airborne Surveillance and Control, (designated S 100D). Compared to the traditional circular radar on AWACS planes, the Saab 340 (S 100) has a non-movable radar that offers lower drag, but has a dead zone directly behind and in front of the plane, with a 120-degree zone of scan on either side of the airframe. The mounted radar is capable of tracking ships, planes, and missiles up to 300 - 400 km while at an altitude of 7,000 m. S 100 Argus is the Swedish military designation for a Saab 340 equipped with Saab Microwave's Erieye airborne radar. The system is used by the Swedish Air Force for Fighting command and air surveillance (STRIL). In 2010, the newer ASC890/S100D replaced the older FSR890/S100B. The name Argus comes from Greek mythology and the giant Argus who with his hundred eyes, some of which were always watching. The two younger systems were delivered to the Swedish Armed Forces in April 2009 and have been fully operational since 1 January 2010. On board the aircraft there are normally two pilots, a flight engineer, and, depending on the task, 1-4 operators who are in charge of the sensors and other parts of the mission system. The operators consist of air combat controllers and aircraft observers. The aircraft's primary sensor is the radar, which consists of an electronically phased array antenna with no moving parts. Specifications: Length 19.73 m Wingspan 21.44 m Height 6.97 m Wing area 41.8 m² Empty weight 8,140 kg Engines 2 × General Electric CT7-9B Max. speed 523 km/h Image:

Saab Globaleye AEW&C

GlobalEye is a multi-role airborne early warning & control (AEW&C) platform made by Swedish defense company Saab. GlobalEye consists of a suite of sensors using Saab's Erieye ER (Extended Range) radar and mission system, installed in the Bombardier Global 6000/6500 long-range business jet. The Swedish government decided in 2021 that the Swedish Armed Forces may purchase new radar surveillance and command & control aircraft. It will be Saab's Globaleye. Saab's Globaleye is based on the long-range Global 6000 aircraft manufactured by Bombardier. These aircraft will replace the older ASC 890 (Saab S 100 Argus) aircraft. Saab's Globaleye has a highly effective radar mounted on top of the fuselage, a so-called Erieye Extended Range, (Erieye ER) which provides extended range. On 14 March 2018, the maiden flight of Globaleye took place from Linköping. Globaleye's primary sensor is the Erieye ER radar for Airborne Early Warning (AEW). It weighs about 1 ton and is mounted on top of the twin-engine jet's fuselage. Saab has claimed a range of up to 450 km (216 nm) for the AEW radar system when flown at an operational altitude of 10,000 m and 550 km at 11,600 m. According to Saab Group, Globaleye can detect and track a combination of airborne and surface targets, both over land and at sea, and is capable of carrying out missions for up to 11 hours. In addition to the AEW radar, Globaleye is equipped with several other sensors. On 30 June 2022, the Swedish Defense Material Administration (FMV) signed a contract with Saab for the delivery of 2 Globaleye aircraft to the Swedish Armed Forces for delivery in 2027. The contract also gives FMV an option for a further order of 2 Globaleye aircraft. Specifications: Length 30.3 m Wingspan 28.7 m Height 7.8 m Empty weight 26,310 kg Max. takeoff weight 45,135 kg Max. flight altitude 15,545 m Engines 2 x Rolls-Royce BR710 A2-20 turbofan Max. speed 935 km/h Range 11,110 km Image:
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Military Hans Högman
Copyright © Hans Högman 2022-06-12

Swedish Combat Aircraft - Signals

Intelligence Aircraft

Signals Intelligence Aircraft

Signals intelligence (SIGINT) is intelligence-gathering by interception of signals, whether communications between people or from electronic signals not directly used in communication. SIGINT involves the exploration and monitoring of data and/or telecommunications traffic through eavesdropping, listening, etc., to gather intelligence and includes the whole chain of collection, processing, analysis, and reporting. The platforms where signal detection equipment is most often installed are towers, ships, and aircraft. Sweden: examples of towers are in Kåseberga, examples of ships are HMS Orion (A 201), and examples of aircraft are S 102B and S 100 Argus.

List of Swedish Signals Intelligence Aircraft

Tp 79 - Douglas DC-3, 8 in Swedish service 1949 - 1984 Tp 52 - English Electric Canberra, 2 in Swedish service 1960 - 1971 Tp 85 - Sud Aviation S.E 210 Caravelle 2 in Swedish service 1972 - 1998 S 102 - Gulfstream IV, 2 in Swedish service 1992 - S 100 - Saab 340, 4 in Swedish service 1997 - Saab Globaleye AEW&C

Swedish Militry Aircraft - 8

To the List of Swedish signals intelligence aircraft

Related Links

Swedish Military Aircraft - start Military Propeller-driven Aircraft Military Jet Aircraft Signal Intelligence Aircraft Military Helicopters Nationality Markings - Sweden History of the Swedish Air Force Unit Designation of the Swedish Air Force Uniforms of the Swedish Air Force Aircraft Warning Service - Female Aircraft Observers, Sweden Sweden’s Military Preparedness 1939 - 1945 Military Images, Sweden, 1939 - 1945 Swedish F 19 Air Wing in Finland in 1940 (Swedish Volunteer Corps)

Source References

1. Flygvapnets historia, överstelöjtnant Lennert Berns 2. Svenska flygvapnets förband och skolor under 1900-talet, Christian Braunstein, 2003 3. Försvarets historiska telesamingar, Flyghistoria från SFF, Flygvapnet 4. Flygvapenmuseum (Swedish Air Force Museum, Linköping) 5. Svenska stridspiloter flög bakom järnridån, artikel i DN 2021-05-27. 6. Wikipedia 7. Digitaltmuseum Top of page

Douglas DC-3, Tp 79

The Douglas DC-3 is a propeller-driven aircraft that existed both in civilian and military versions. It is one of the world's most widely produced transport and passenger aircraft. The prototype flew as early as 17 December 1935. In total, more than 16,000 DC-3s were produced (mainly for military use). The DC-3 had its heyday during World War II when the need for fast transport increased enormously. A military version with a cargo door, a reinforced floor, reinforced wings, and increased maximum take- off weight, was designated C-47 Skytrain. This version was by far the most produced. The RAF and RCAF designated the aircraft the Dakota. The military troop transport version in turn became the C-53 Skytrooper. As early as 1937, the Swedish airline ABA (AB Aerotransport) bought a few DC-3s to be used on international routes. During World War II a courier service was maintained by ABA to England with DC- 3s. They always flew in bad weather and with the lights off, but on the night of 27-28 August 1943, the Gladan (SE-BAF) disappeared over the North Sea on its way home from Scotland. Courier traffic continued and on 22 October 1943, the Gripen (SE-BAG) was attacked by German fighters and only two of the crew survived. After these two shoot- downs, flights were suspended for a time. After the war, a large number of DC-3s were available on the second-hand market, and ABA added several aircraft to its fleet. Between 1949 and 1984, Douglas DC-3s were used by the Swedish Air Force as transport aircraft, designated Tp 79. The Air Force purchased its first two DC-3s in 1949, which were converted for use in signals intelligence. The last Tp 79 was purchased in 1975. In total, the Air Force operated eight aircraft, but never more than six at any one time. The last aircraft was retired in 1984. Among the many uses of the aircraft in the Swedish Air Force were signals intelligence, material transport, development and testing of new electronics and radar equipment, training of navigators, transport of Army paratroopers, VIP transport, etc. Most famous is 79001, the Tp 79 spy plane that on a spy mission was shot down by Soviet fighter aircraft on 13 June 1952, which gave rise to the so- called Catalina Affair. The 79001 was used for signals intelligence and the nickname was Hugin. Hugin's sister aircraft was 79002, also used for signals intelligence, and it was nicknamed Munin. Both came to the Air Force in 1949 and were based at F 8 Barkarby Air Wing, without either a fin identification code or a Wing number. In Norse mythology, Hugin and Munin are Odin's two ravens that he sends out into the world daily to gather information for him. So, Hugin and Munin are appropriate names for the two spy planes. More information on Signals intelligence and the Catalina Affair Specifications: Length 19.64 m Wingspan 28.95 m Height 5.16 m Empty weight 8,030 kg Max. takeoff weight 12,200 kg Engines 2 × Pratt & Whitney R-1830-90C Engine power 2 x 1,200 hp Max. speed 250 km/h Range 2,420 km Max. flight altitude 5,000 m Load capacity 2,500 kg Troop capacity 21 - 32 soldiers Images:
Douglas DC3 (Tp 79 Hugin with identification No 79001) at Svea Wing F8 at Barkarby in 1951, i.e. the year before it was shot down by the Soviets. Image: Wikipedia.
Douglas DC3 Tp 79 with identification No 79004, low overflight after last military take-off from Bromma Airport on 3 April 1984. Image: Wikipedia.

English Electric Canberra Tp 52

The English Electric Canberra was a British first- generation jet-powered bomber developed shortly after World War II. The jet propulsion enabled the Canberra aircraft to fly higher and faster than any previous bomber, and thus also avoid being engaged by enemy air defenses. The Swedish Air Force acquired a Canberra (s/n 52001) in February 1960 to be used primarily for signals intelligence and yet another aircraft (52002) in March 1960 to be used as a flying research platform. These were designated Tp 52 in Sweden. The two aircraft were secretly modified in Sweden as spy planes for signals intelligence gathering on the Soviet, Polish, and East German military radio transmissions, although this was not publicly acknowledged until ten years later. They were replaced by two Caravelles Tp 85 in 1971. Specifications: Length 21.3 m Wingspan 19.3 m Height 4.7 m Max. takeoff weight 17,200 kg Max. speed 930 km/h Image:
The preparing of a Canberra Tp 52 (52002) for takeoff at Östgöta Wing (F 3) in 1973. Image: Flygvapenmuseum, ID: FVMF.002908.

Sud Aviation Caravelle Tp 85

The Sud Aviation Caravelle is a jet aircraft manufactured in France that was groundbreaking as it was the first jet-powered aircraft with the engines located in the aft section and not in the wings. The first flight took place in May 1955. Between 1972 and 1998, Sud Aviation Caravelle was part of the Swedish Air Force with the Swedish military designation Tp 85. TP 85 entered service primarily to replace Tp 52 Canberra as the Swedish Defense Radio Establishment's signals intelligence aircraft. Two aircraft were purchased from SAS. The last flight of 85172 took place in September 1998. TP 85 was replaced in its role as a signals intelligence aircraft by S 102B Gulfstream IV. Specifications: Length 32.0 - 36.2 m Wingspan 34.3 m Height 8.72 m Wing area 146.7 m² Empty weight 24,185 - 30,055 kg Max. takeoff weight 46,000 - 56,000 kg Engines 2 × Rolls-Royce Avon RA.29 and P&W CT8D Max. speed 850 km/h (Mach 0,81) Range 3,200 km Max. flight altitude 8,500 m Image:
Swedish signals intelligence aircraft Gulfstream IV, S 102B Korpen (G-IV), s/n 102002, in 2006. Note the elongated appliance extension on the underside. Image: Wikipedia.
Signals intelligence aircraft Tp 85 Sud Aviation Caravelle, 1970. Image: Flygvapenmuseum, ID: FVM.149957.
Saab GlobalEye AEW&C. Image: Saab.
Saab S 100B Argus (Saab 340 AEW&C) in flight. Image: Swedish Armed Forces.

Gulfstream IV, S 102B

The Gulfstream IV (or G-IV) is a twin-engine business jet aircraft manufactured by Gulfstream Aerospace in the United States. The Swedish Air Force has since 1992 three Gulfstream IV in its fleet which goes under the designation Tp 102C (1 aircraft), (and one Gulfstream G550 with designation Tp 102D) and two S 102B. The Tp 102A, which was the first individual purchased in 1992, was retired in August 2015. The TP 102C/D (and former TP 102A) is mainly used for long and time-critical transport of Sweden's highest civilian and military leadership as well as the Royal Family. The S 102B has been converted to carry out airborne signals intelligence for the Swedish Defense Radio Agency (FRA) and can be identified by the elongated equipment extension underneath. The two S 102Bs are sometimes referred to as the Raven (Korpen) and the two aircraft individuals as Hugin and Munin. Specifications: Length 26.9 m Wingspan 23.7 m Height 7.44 m Empty weight 19,500 kg Max. takeoff weight 33,200 kg Engines 2 × Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 Max. speed 935 km/h Range 7,820 km Max. flight altitude 13,700 m Image:

Saab 340 AEW&C – S 100 Argus

The Saab 340 AEW&C is a Swedish twin-engine propeller-driven airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) aircraft manufactured by Saab AB and based on the Saab 340 civil passenger aircraft. The aircraft entered service with the Swedish Air Force in 1997. The Swedish Air Force uses 6 Saab 340 AEW&C. In the Air Force, the Saab 340 AEW&C is designated S 100 Argus, and all aircraft belong to the Skaraborg Air Wing (F 7) but are stationed at Malmen Airbase in Malmslätt outside Linköping. Two of the aircraft are built for peacetime transport missions (designated Tp 100A and Tp 100C), while the other 4 aircraft (S 100) are permanently equipped for Fighting command and air surveillance (STRIL) - Air Defense Control System. The system was delivered to the Air Force in the late 1990s. Two of the aircraft are equipped with the older FSR 890 system, Airborne Surveillance and Control 890, (designated S 100B), and two with the newer ASC 890 system, Airborne Surveillance and Control, (designated S 100D). Compared to the traditional circular radar on AWACS planes, the Saab 340 (S 100) has a non-movable radar that offers lower drag, but has a dead zone directly behind and in front of the plane, with a 120-degree zone of scan on either side of the airframe. The mounted radar is capable of tracking ships, planes, and missiles up to 300 - 400 km while at an altitude of 7,000 m. S 100 Argus is the Swedish military designation for a Saab 340 equipped with Saab Microwave's Erieye airborne radar. The system is used by the Swedish Air Force for Fighting command and air surveillance (STRIL). In 2010, the newer ASC890/S100D replaced the older FSR890/S100B. The name Argus comes from Greek mythology and the giant Argus who with his hundred eyes, some of which were always watching. The two younger systems were delivered to the Swedish Armed Forces in April 2009 and have been fully operational since 1 January 2010. On board the aircraft there are normally two pilots, a flight engineer, and, depending on the task, 1-4 operators who are in charge of the sensors and other parts of the mission system. The operators consist of air combat controllers and aircraft observers. The aircraft's primary sensor is the radar, which consists of an electronically phased array antenna with no moving parts. Specifications: Length 19.73 m Wingspan 21.44 m Height 6.97 m Wing area 41.8 m² Empty weight 8,140 kg Engines 2 × General Electric CT7-9B Max. speed 523 km/h Image:

Saab Globaleye AEW&C

GlobalEye is a multi-role airborne early warning & control (AEW&C) platform made by Swedish defense company Saab. GlobalEye consists of a suite of sensors using Saab's Erieye ER (Extended Range) radar and mission system, installed in the Bombardier Global 6000/6500 long-range business jet. The Swedish government decided in 2021 that the Swedish Armed Forces may purchase new radar surveillance and command & control aircraft. It will be Saab's Globaleye. Saab's Globaleye is based on the long-range Global 6000 aircraft manufactured by Bombardier. These aircraft will replace the older ASC 890 (Saab S 100 Argus) aircraft. Saab's Globaleye has a highly effective radar mounted on top of the fuselage, a so-called Erieye Extended Range, (Erieye ER) which provides extended range. On 14 March 2018, the maiden flight of Globaleye took place from Linköping. Globaleye's primary sensor is the Erieye ER radar for Airborne Early Warning (AEW). It weighs about 1 ton and is mounted on top of the twin-engine jet's fuselage. Saab has claimed a range of up to 450 km (216 nm) for the AEW radar system when flown at an operational altitude of 10,000 m and 550 km at 11,600 m. According to Saab Group, Globaleye can detect and track a combination of airborne and surface targets, both over land and at sea, and is capable of carrying out missions for up to 11 hours. In addition to the AEW radar, Globaleye is equipped with several other sensors. On 30 June 2022, the Swedish Defense Material Administration (FMV) signed a contract with Saab for the delivery of 2 Globaleye aircraft to the Swedish Armed Forces for delivery in 2027. The contract also gives FMV an option for a further order of 2 Globaleye aircraft. Specifications: Length 30.3 m Wingspan 28.7 m Height 7.8 m Empty weight 26,310 kg Max. takeoff weight 45,135 kg Max. flight altitude 15,545 m Engines 2 x Rolls-Royce BR710 A2-20 turbofan Max. speed 935 km/h Range 11,110 km Image: